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Releases (Available titles)

[TR-52] HEINZ HOPF - Gothenburg CD - 8 EUR
After having delighted in a few excellent tapes and a LP it is time to enjoy this first CD of the duet from Gothenburg, Sweden. Dan Johansson and Matthias Andresson are some of the best at what they do. The noise is solid, dense like lead, free of intricate experiments and gloomy pathos. It is made of simplicity and power. Pure pleasure. 





[TR-51] MACRONYMPHA - Studio 95 CD - 8 EUR
Personally, I don't quite favor the bands with long discography lists, although MACRONYMPHA is an exception because you can never get too much of it. The CD contains studio material recorded in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania in 1995. Those 30 cassette copies that were originally released are now re-released in the CDs with a new mastering. Embarking on this multi-layered, heavy vintage noise be prepared for a lot of dirt, electronic signals, hissings and falling to pieces cassette tapes. Classics. 




[TR-50] INCAPACITANTS - mon, ma? mon!!! CD - 9 EUR / Review (VERY FEW LEFT)
Continuing celebration of their recent 30-year anniversary iconic Japanese band INCAPACITANTS presents a new gift for their devotees. The newest CD contains 60 minutes of exhausting psychedelic kind of noise. Inedible mush made of whistling feedback and drilling high frequencies. Cumbersome, nasty debris of harsh noise. 




[TR-47] MAAAA / K2 - Split CD - 8 EUR / Review
New compositions by a Warsaw couple and a Japanese surgeon are presented on this 50-minute album. The couple buzzes using the synthesizer Korg MS-20 and the Polivoks, and they clink damaging iron pieces and coil springs. Dr. Kusafuka keeps handling his stylus like a scalpel. Having decided not to employ metal garbage, he turns to extensive use of his analog synthesizer Korg MS-20 and the soft version of it for Nintdedo DS, creating loud and sharp pieces of work reminiscent of a surgical knife cutting flesh. All in all, be prepared for the heavy analog modulations, drilling feedback, rich bass, pulsations, biting high frequencies and the hazardous loudness of the record. Harsh Noise. Edition 300 copies in a package with 8-page booklet. 



[TR-46] FIRST HUMAN FERRO - Homo Shargey CD - 8 EUR / Review
Alexander Shargey (also known as Yuriy Kondratyuk) is a representative of passionate enthusiastic inventors who put their lives at stake to accomplish the mission for the future good of the whole mankind. Shargey belongs to a cohort of scientists who were the first to foresee the space conquering. They were great yet mocked-at dreamers and had to fight against all odds twice as hard. Shargey is a "recognized" space theoretic of unique unconventional genius. The name of a self-made engineer since decades has become well up to par with famous scientists like Tsiolkovskiy, Tsander, Korolyov. Ukrainian FIRST HUMAN FERRO project led by Olegh Kolyada pays a long overdue tribute to its compatriot composing a well-crafted vintage dark ambient album with both poignant and mesmerizing layers of sidereal voyage. Homo Shargey was pre-mastered by Italian ambient magician Vestigial. The packaging consists of a luxurious A5-sized digipak with silver finish and gloss varmish, conceptually designed by Marcin Łojek at Ibsen Design. Only 500 copies made. This particular release is a cooperative effort of New Nihilism, fellow Requiem Productions and Triangle Records. 



Related:

MAAAA - Decay and Demoralization CD (2010) - 7 EUR / Review
Maaaa are a duo that mostly keeps their noise "pure," only occasionally allowing slips of black metal sounds and imagery (i.e., their indecipherable logo). The approach though is purely old school harsh noise: no drone passages, no poetry, no drums or horns, just pure unadulterated feedback and junk metal. The feedback squall of "Karelia" that stays frozen while the junk metal pounds around it definitely sounds like a nod to the US masters Macronympha. "Must" isn't as clearly based on banging on metal garbage, but instead sounds like windchimes from hell rattling around as broken megaphones randomly spew out random sounds in the distance before everything is reduced to simply water running and echoed feedback, providing one of the few "calm" moments on the album, and even that is a bit of a stretch. "Be" cranks back up the clattering metal percussion, with warbling noises and a few sustained tones, but for the most part remains a consistently flowing river of violent racket. "Destroyed" represents the closest this disc gets to a rhythm, but it still makes Test Dept. and SPK sound quaint in comparison. Above that, it's a jumpy mix, with feedback-drenched echoes jumpily edited together to provide a raw, dynamic experience. The metal elements of "Vivian" are almost industrial in their overt presentation, but are overshadowed by the roar of a jet engine blasting along, with only slight variations in pitch, so it sort of flirts with the Harsh Noise Walls subgenre but with the variations that occur keep it a bit more varied. There is an almost jarring cut to what must be a recording in a bathroom that segues into a torrent of black metal before going back to do the noise thing, which makes for an interesting irony…it's the more conventional sounds that are shocking within this context. The closer "Satan Edge" actually constitutes about half of the disc, making it a substantial piece of work. Beginning with a worn vinyl rendition of a black mass, it goes quickly into sharp, waxy noise and layered feedback, with an emphasis on the high-end frequencies. Surprisingly, it's not quite AS pummeling as the other tracks, letting a bit more of the layers show through, but I'm speaking in relative terms here. There are a few oddities, such as some almost glitch-type sounds and more sampled thrash guitar, but on the whole it stays a long, heavy track of varied sounds. Because of its strict adherence to an old school noise mentality, there's not a lot of surprise or innovation to be found, but not that there needs to be. It sounds as if it could be from the mid '90s, or, as I think of it, the Golden Age of Noise, hand-dubbed onto a cassette tape out of necessity, not because of it being "cool." My only complaint, which is probably showing my age more than I should, is that it's just a bit too loud. It reminds me of those noise releases Relapse put out, where it is intentionally mastered at a painfully high level. It ends up requiring too much fine tuning on the volume knob to find that sweet spot of loudness, but not so much that everything is obscured (or deafness begins to set in). It's a small complaint though, and the positives definitely outweigh that single negative. (Reviewed by Brainwashed.com)





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